smoll-banner--2

 

Nest We Grow | Kuma + Berkeley UC


a 8
Photo © Shinkenchiku-sha

From the architect:
In response to an international design-build competition, our team proposed a quintessentially Californian approach embracing many ideas still new to Asia, from where most of us hail. These Californian ideas formed into Nest we Grow, which grew from a shared interest in the materials that make up our build environment with a focus on renewable materials.

Nest We Grow won the 4th Annual LIXIL International design-build competition in 2014, and unlike structures built in the first years of the competition, it is an open, public structure. Its main intent is to bring people in the community together to store, prepare and enjoy local foods in the setting of Hokkaido, Japan.

Our team of graduate students, comprised of two Taiwanese, two Chinese, and one American, sought to examine what structural and material elements we could combine to create this community and food oriented space. We recognized how modest materials and actions are celebrated in Berkeley and wanted to explore their implications in Asia.

Our initial research started with techniques we find readily in California, including rammed- earth walls and straw bale construction. We presented these ideas in pursuit of a building that would introduce renewable building techniques to an area of Japan that could take advantage of these concepts. What we found was an appreciation for the difficulty of applying transnational technology in a new environment.

We also focused on a heavy timber construction technique coming from the US, which uses large sections of wood. In Japan this translated to the composite column, which uses smaller pieces of wood to generate a larger column. It took considerable effort to identify a way to join materials, which was influenced by both local carpentry practices and the Japanese material market. We were also under a considerable time constraint with the entire building process taking only six months to complete.


a 1
Photo © Shinkenchiku-sha

a 3
Photo © Shinkenchiku-sha

a 6
Photo © Shinkenchiku-sha

The wood frame structure mimics the vertical spatial experience of a Japanese larch forest from which food is hung to grow and dry. A tea platform in the middle of the nest creates a gathering space where the community can visually and physically enjoy food around a sunken fireplace. Local foods make up the elevation of the Nest as people see the food forest floating above the landform.

The wall at the base of the building, in addition to creating a micro topography, helps to block the prevailing northwest winter wind. The Nest takes advantage of the transparent plastic corrugated sheets on the facade and roof, allowing light in for the plants, and heating the space during colder months, extending the usability of the Nest.

Sliding panels in the facade and roof open to facilitate air movement through the structure during the summer and warmer parts of the day. The tea platform sits up into the Nest, keeping it in the warm air created by the skin during the colder months, and in a cross ventilated area during the warm summer months.


The openness of the facade allows the building to incorporate the surrounding natural environment into the interior climate, but can also be closed off to create a buffer between the two. The funnel-shaped roof harvests rain water and snow melt. The collected water is delivered to tanks that are then used to irrigate the plants in the concrete wall. The shape signifies the Nest’s ability to bring nature in the form of air, water and light into the Nest.

The program of the Nest is decided according to the life cycle of these local foods: growing, harvesting, storing, cooking/dining, and composting, which restarts the cycle. All members of the community help to complete each stage, allowing the structure to become a platform for group learning and gathering activities in the Nest throughout the year. Community participation extends and completes the life cycle of local foods, which is a symbiotic relationship. This is the time-line of people and food in the Nest, and this is the Nest for people and food.


a 7
Photo © Shinkenchiku-sha

a 9
Photo © Shinkenchiku-sha

a 10
Photo © Shinkenchiku-sha

Από τους αρχιτέκτονες:
Ανταποκρινόμενη σε διεθνή διαγωνισμό σχεδιασμού και δόμησης, η ομάδα μας πρότεινε μια, κατά κύριο λόγο, καλιφορνέζικη προσέγγιση, η οποία ασπάζεται πολλές ιδέες ακόμα καινούριες για τα πρότυπα της Ασίας, από την οποία οι περισσότεροι από εμάς καταγόμαστε. Αυτές οι ιδέες διαμόρφωσαν  το project Nest We Grow, το οποίο γεννήθηκε από το κοινό μας ενδιαφέρον για τα υλικά που απαρτίζουν το δομημένο περιβάλλον στο οποίο ζούμε, εστιάζοντας, ειδικά, στα ανανεώσιμα υλικά.

Το Nest We Grow κέρδισε το 4ο ετήσιο διεθνή διαγωνισμό σχεδιασμού και δόμησης της LIXIL το 2014 και, σε αντίθεση, με τις κατασκευές των προηγούμενων ετών, αποτελεί μια ανοιχτή, δημόσια κατασκευή. Η κύρια πρόθεση πίσω από το project είναι να φέρουμε τους κατοίκους της κοινότητας κοντά, συγκεκριμένα τους κατοίκους του Hokkaido στην Ιαπωνία, έτσι ώστε να μπορούν σε έναν κοινό χώρο να μοιράζονται, να προετοιμάζουν και να απολαμβάνουν την τοπική τους κουζίνα.

Η ομάδα μας, που απαρτίζεται από απόφοιτους φοιτητές, δύο από την Ταϊβάν, δύο από την Κίνα κι έναν από τις Η.Π.Α., προσπάθησε να εξετάσει ποια δομικά και υλικά στοιχεία θα μπορούσαμε να συνδυάσουμε για να δημιουργήσουμε αυτόν τον κοινό χώρο με κατεύθυνση προς την κουλτούρα του φαγητού. Λαμβάνοντας υπόψη ότι τα απλά υλικά και οι απέριττη προσέγγιση προτιμούνται στο Berkeley, θελήσαμε να εξερευνήσουμε τις επιδράσεις τους στην Ασία.

Η αρχική μας έρευνα ξεκίνησε με τεχνικές που προϋπήρχαν στην Καλιφόρνια, όπως η ωμοπλινθοδομή (κατασκευή δηλαδή με χρήση πλίνθων που δεν έχουν υποστεί όπτηση) και δόμηση με άχυρο. Παρουσιάσαμε αυτές τις ιδέες στην προσπάθειά μας να σχεδιάσουμε ένα κτήριο το οποίο θα εισήγαγε πράσινες τεχνικές σε μία περιοχή της Ιαπωνίας που θα μπορούσε να επωφεληθεί από αυτή την φιλοσοφία δόμησης. Το αποτέλεσμα ήταν να εκτιμήσουμε τις δυσκολίες εφαρμογής δι-εθνικής τεχνολογίας σε ένα καινούριο περιβάλλον.

Επίσης, εστιάσαμε σε μια τεχνική βαριάς ξύλινης κατασκευής που προέρχεται από τις Η.Π.Α. και η οποία κάνει χρήση μεγάλων ξύλινων δοκών. Στην Ιαπωνία, αυτό μεταφράζεται στην σύνθετη κολώνα, που χρησιμοποιεί μικρότερα ξύλινα στοιχεία για να καταλήξει σε μια μεγαλύτερη κολώνα. Απαιτήθηκε πολύ χρόνος για να καθοριστεί η σύνδεση των υλικών, η οποία εξαρτήθηκε τόσο από την τοπικές ξυλουργικές πρακτικές όσο και από τα διαθέσιμα υλικά στην Ιαπωνία. Επίσης, ήμαστε πιεσμένοι χρονικά, γιατί όλη η διαδικασία κατασκευής έπρεπε να ολοκληρωθεί σε έξι μήνες.


a 11
Photo © Shinkenchiku-sha

a 12
Photo © Shinkenchiku-sha

Η τοιχοποιία στη βάση του κτηρίου, εκτός από το ότι δημιουργεί μια μικροτοπογραφία, βοηθάει στην προστασία από τους ισχυρούς νοτιοδυτικούς ανέμους. Η Φωλιά εκμεταλλεύεται τα διαφανή, πλαστικά πάνελς στις προσόψεις και την οροφή, επιτρέποντας τον φυσικό φωτισμό για την ανάπτυξη των φυτών, και την θέρμανση του χώρου, κατά τη διάρκεια των ψυχρών μηνών, αυξάνοντας μέσα στο έτος τη διάρκεια χρήσης της Φωλιάς.

Κινητά πάνελς στις προσόψεις και την οροφή ανοίγουν για να διευκολύνουν την κίνηση του αέρα μέσα στην κατασκευή, κατά τη διάρκεια του καλοκαιριού και των θερμών ωρών της ημέρας, γενικά. Ο χώρος για το τσάι είναι τοποθετημένος έτσι ώστε να εκμεταλλεύεται τα θερμά ρεύματα αέρα που δημιουργούνται από την επιδερμίδα του κτηρίου τους ψυχρούς μήνες, αλλά και την περιοχή μεγαλύτερου αερισμού κατά τη διάρκεια των θερμών καλοκαιρινών μηνών.

Το γεγονός ότι το κτήριο διαθέτει ανοικτές προσόψεις, επιτρέπει σε αυτό να εντάξει το γύρω φυσικό περιβάλλον μέσα στους εσωτερικούς χώρους, αλλά μπορεί επίσης να κλείσει ώστε να δημιουργήσει παθητικό εμπόδιο μεταξύ των δύο. Η οροφή στο σχήμα χοάνης μαζεύει το νερό της βροχής και το χιόνι. Το νερό που συγκεντρώνεται καταλήγει σε δεξαμενές που χρησιμοποιούνται για το πότισμα των φυτών μέσα στους τοίχους από πηλό. Το σχήμα αντικατοπτρίζει την ικανότητα της Φωλιάς να φέρνει μέσα της την φύση στη μορφή του νερού, του αέρα και του φωτός.

Το πρόγραμμα της Φωλιάς καθορίζεται ανάλογα με τον κύκλο ζωής των τοπικών τροφίμων: η καλλιέργεια, η συγκομιδή, η αποθήκευση, το μαγείρεμα/δείπνο, και η παραγωγή κομπόστ, που ξεκινάει τον κύκλο ξανά από την αρχή. Όλα τα μέλη της κοινότητας συνεισφέρουν στην ολοκλήρωση του κάθε σταδίου, δίνοντας τη δυνατότητα στη Φωλιά να είναι μια πλατφόρμα για ομαδική εκπαίδευση και δραστηριότητες συνάθροισης μέσα στο έτος. Η συλλογική συμμετοχή επεκτείνει κι ολοκληρώνει τον κύκλο ζωής των τοπικών τροφίμων σε μια συμβιωτική σχέση. Αυτό είναι το χρονολόγιο των ανθρώπων και των τροφίμων στη Φωλιά, και αυτή είναι η Φωλιά των ανθρώπων και του φαγητού.


a 13
Photo © Shinkenchiku-sha

a 14
Photo © Shinkenchiku-sha


Info:

Architects: College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates
Location: Hokkaido, Japan
Area: 85.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Shinkenchiku-sha
Design Team: Hsiu Wei Chang, Hsin- Yu Chen, Fenzheng Dong, Yan Xin Huang, Baxter Smith (Instructors: Dana Buntrock, Mark Anderson)

Texts and photos via


Διαδώστε το


b 16
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 8
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 12
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 15
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 9
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 13
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 14
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 11
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 22
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 21
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 4
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 5
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 6
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 7
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 17
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 2
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 19
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates

b 3
Image © College of Environmental Design UC Berkeley, Kengo Kuma & Associates
VENETA CUCINEbl   designshop          
               
όλοι οι προμηθευτές